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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
their hands and to fix our broken immigration system. mr. speaker, last summer republicans and democrats in the senate came together and passed comprehensive immigration reform with a strong bipartisan vote, a vote of 68 to 32. 68-32. that's like a superduper majority. in fact, one poll last month showed that 63% of americans, 2/3 of americans, support a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. business leaders, chambers of commerce, labor unions, faith groups, immigrant families, law enforcement officials, and americans of every race, creed, color, and ethnicity all across our country applauded our senators for reaching across the aisle. for many it really gave hope and belief in our government that we are still capable of putting aside political posturing and to build consensus around the difficult issues that face our country. but today as i speak americans are asking, what happened? they are confused as to why the house of representatives can't do the same thing that the senate did and pass immigration reform. they are even more confused as to why the house can't even dignify
-span. >> president obama's use of power related to the health care law. immigration policies and drug laws. coverage ofour live the hearing starting at 10:00 c-span 2.rn on are you walk in, there tables in front with lots of pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. temperature pamphlet is how the take ment is trying to away the right to own guns, obama is doing that and obama is that and obama care is awful. talk to them. they said, who are you? i'm an academic, a researcher. research about these organizations and ideas. i study men who believe this stuff. and a bunch of them said -- they looked at me suspiciously and and i said, tions look here's what i am. don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your world view. you will not convince me. you.l not convince that's the table. i want to understand why you think the way you do. downward mobility, racial and gender equality. "angry white men," sunday night 9:00 on "after words" part of c-span 2. > vice president biden is in asia this week. his trip comes eight days after would required it all
for the nearly 6,000 syrians with approved immigrant petitions to the united states. as hundreds of millions around the world prepare to celebrate the most joyful day of the christian calendar, the international community must intensify its efforts to end this terrible war and also to protect syria's christians and to ensure the continued vitality of this 2,000-year-old community. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the innovativeness of american enterprise flies off the radar. according to amazon c.e.o., the company is fixing to deliver packages to its customers via drones. it's called amazon prime air. that's right. in just a few years, he says people will be able to order something online and have it in their hands within 30 minutes by the use of drones. sounds like something out of the "jetsons" doesn't it? soon there will be a drone to replace the mail carrier. according to amazon, these packages will deliver up to five pounds. mr. speaker, thousands of americans use amaz
. more than half of americans also don't like the way he is handling foreign policy. immigration and the economy. the data now raising concerns over what can still be accomplished in his next few years as president. joining us now is our political panel angela mcgrewen, fox knew political analyst, and ronow molono. the president used to enjoy euphoric ratings. now his approval rating is abysmal on all kinds of issues. so ways happening overall? why is this happening? what kind of take do you look at this -- what prism do you look at this through, angela? >> the bottom line is this. are you better off today than you were four years ago? most americans that elected this president yet again, now they're having buyers remorse, because most americans are not better off. if you look at the unemployment rate at 7% but for the black community, last check, it was 13%. the hispanic community has not lowered that much and for women and young adults, if you have a college degree, kelly, most people don't have a job today, so people are looking at this situation and though the president is a
similar to the nazis whose members mainly target immigrants upon receiving such orders. the topography sucks. that so far. it is located in a special day dana. despite the religious attacks and immigrants who condones popularity has seen a surge in recent polls amid rising illegal immigration from the middle east europe spring. if greece were to hold elections golden dawn could potentially come as the third largest party in parliament . three militants killed by israeli security forces last week belonged to an al qa'ida linked terror group in which a team spirit council has said on its website. new claims raise concerns in the west bank of rising jihadist activity which has already been established in the gaza strip for more than a decade. the organizations said in a statement. we announced to the nation to its late nights with the grace of going beyond the only team to play for has attained a foothold in the west bank of everyone had tried to report every six months. israeli security agency shin bet did not specify feel that it's killed what else they demand this quilt in a statement
want to see a gop president again, they must sign on to immigration reform. good news for amnesty advocate. speaker boehner hiring a high-profile adviser that is well known for helping senator john mccain passed amnesty and speaker boehner telling several business individuals that he will start holding immigration votes after the deadline for the 2014 midterm. so maybe we have a sense of what we can expect. you don't have to tell the chamber of commerce that the speaker is working to enact immigration reform. donohue issued everyone that speaker boehner would do exactly that. we will find out. we are back with monica, matt, and david. let's begin with you. we are calling for a recall. >> sooner or later you face your reality and you don't see upward mobility. whatever it is, if you see no future, you don't want to stay home forever home forever and be vacated as a bartender while your parents paid 80,000 foreign education. that is the reality that the me millennial space. and no matter what people want to call obama or his policies if you don't see upward mobility, you can't have
of minimum wage, the issue of jobs. you know, we still have -- >> overall economy, immigration. >> exactly right. but trust me, it's just going to be all about health care, health care, health care. and that's really a shame of the and then just one other point -- >> and those people we should say who are out there in various congressional districts, obviously particularly the tough congressional districts, there's nothing they can do about it. >> there's nothing they can do about it, but another point i wanted to make is i've been critical of president obama on a number of issues. but however anybody feels about obama care, it is the law of the land and it really bothers me that the republican party really wants this thing to fail. and i just don't think it's in anyone's interests for this whole thing to collapse in a heap. that's really a shame. >> interesting over the weekend, e.j., cardinal dolan was on "meet the press" and he said catholic bishops have been huge supporters of universal health care but obviously they didn't agree with the mandates for hospitals to cover birth control.
2014 budget. the farm bill. and immigration reform. reaching across the aisle has become more and more difficult and principled compromise seems like a mountain too tall to climb. this morning, i have the honor of introducing two national leaders who can hopefully help shed some light on how our legislative colleagues in washington, d.c. and the white house might be able to come together and find solutions to our nation's critical problems. let me begin with governor huntsman. he began his public service as a staff assistant to ronald reagan. he has since served four u.s. presidents in critical roles, including u.s. ambassador to singapore, deputy assistant secretary of commerce for asia, u.s. trade ambassador and most recently, u.s. ambassador to china. twice elected as utah's governor, he brought about strong economic reforms, tripled the state's rainy day fund, and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. in his tenure, utah was named the best state in america and the best state in which to do business. he serves as co-chair of no labels with u.s. senator joe masden. it's w
from food to raise awareness of the need for a bipartisan remedy for our broken immigration -- immigration system. support for the fasters is growing. like many in the united states -- in the u.s. they want to find a solution for immigrant families living in this great country that they call home. we can all agree it's time to modernize our immigration laws. fixing what is broken will not be an easy task but it will bring benefits to our nation which can be strengthened and reinvigorated by those hardworking individuals. i encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reach across one another, begin a conversation and resolve this issue. we can work together to secure our bordered and honor the rule of law while addressing the problems in our immigration system with solutions that reflect our american principles. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and
mccain's top aides on immigration. she is now going to be part of the office and advising him on immigration. do you think that is a positive sign? guest: a positive sign. we have more than 11 million undocumented individuals who live in this country who should be part of the mainstream to the extent we can create a pathway to citizenship, that is tough is tough butthat fair, that make sure people can pursue gainful employment and make sure no one has a serious criminal record. you have 11 million undocumented immigrants. you can engage in mass deportation. the status quote is unacceptable. or you can pursue copperheads of immigration reform. that is the course that is most effective. host: do you agree with the president? is the course that is most appropriate. >> do you agree with the president when he says that the only way to get it done is by step-by-step? the day, ind of think it is important for a bill to be brought to the floor of the house of representatives and frost to find something that can be passed at conference committee. for talking with us. the houses in earl
, immigration. needless to say, for a period of time, this will obviously involve israeli participation. it has to. but there also have to be objective standards by which we measure performance. the former police commissioner in boston, ed davis, who is widely respected in the law- enforcement community, was in the west bank in august offering his strategic counsel. we will work with this as professionally as anybody has ever done. we will not leave things to chance. there is a serious responsibility that comes with statehood. and i have shared that notion with my friends in the west bank, and they take it seriously. they do. it will take time to train, build, equip, and test palestinian institutions to ensure that they are capable of protecting palestinian citizens. their primary responsibility is that. and also preventing their territory from being used for attacks on israel. now, i have heard all the arguments. we pulled out of lebanon. look what we got. we got rockets. we pulled out of gaza. look what we got. we got rockets. yeah, we did, but we also didn't settle any of the issues. unilate
and when he signed it into law and throughat up immigration and stuff like that. give the american people a voice. the house judiciary committee held a hearing recovered -- we about the president and executive power, republicans siding that he change the health power andy executive that he has done the same on other issues. that,'re interested in you can go to our website c- span.org and you can see it there. we covered that hearing yesterday. that policyying differences don't constitute a constitutional crisis. that was their opinion of yesterday's hearing. in ohio.to ed republican. caller: good morning. of course people should be fired. from the head of the fish to the bottom. there is a pattern in this whole administration. it is nonstop. denial, denial, deny -- they are --yal to ridiculously that would be the last person he would fire. people keep forgetting all of these little things they slipped in. he is very bright. he came in as a community organizer, he will go out as one. he just changed the role again. we will postpone it until after the midterms. corporations do not have to f
of the ins if you chose to ignore pat on an immigration issue you do it on your own. the senator does a lot of things that are below the radar screen that make a big difference in the lives of other people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. he is not a show horse. he is a work horse. he has been a long time leader in the international campaign against landmi mines. he authored a bill to ban the export of these horrible weapons and spearheaded the effort to aid victims of land minds by creating a special fund and that fund has now on annual bases provide $12 million in aid to the vaccinaictims of these bomb. he sponsored the patrick leahy law and that prohibits the department of state and defense to provide military aid to foreign military and police forces that engage and violate human rights. and he never stops leading on an issue central to our mission at human rights first and that is refuge protection. and the act he sponsors elimina eliminates them from not having safe places to go. in 2009, he called for the creation of an independent investigation for torture after 9-11. he
at the bench at the one who is an american accent in its honor our immigrants to snow. i'm also interested in and how. i'll wear it. families can come to this place they didn't and made it home and i struggled but you know what the last two games against that. that is also kind of coming to you some of that. stories that they try to tell him i just did it. however to see it essentially. and how we like it i know a. it is. sells steve. the knee is booked in at this hour. in june and then receive double again to speak life into the elusive out at the games and handling the dems didn't get right than ample oh seven amateur singing officially recognized
they papers, andals, no getting paid under the table. i have nothing against illegal immigrants. but what i think the country --uld do is just let people wherever they from, as long as they are citizens -- if the illegals want to work, let them get citizenship. stopoliticians have to letting this go because it is going to end up happening like a lot of people say, all part-time jobs. the city i live in? all democrats. every single one of them is a democrat. you cannot walk down the street or go into a store without seeing an immigrant. i lived here for 25 years. it used to be beautiful 20 years ago. the crime rate is skyrocketing. pictures of -- he had been held by north korean officials for a time. theas today they freed veteran of the korean war after a weeklong detention, ending the -- after he oversaw a group of north koreans -- gloria in chicago, good morning. good morning. i am in the 55 and older group. i am so happy the economy is getting better. i have a friend with a full-time and part-time job. there are jobs out here. if the people are so upset and they don't think it is getting
immigration to civil lib we can at this. the top pick is bill brackton. most recently he has been with the los angeles police department. if he picked, braton would take over for ray kelley. under his leadership, the crime dropped but the nypd has been accuse did of excessive surveillance and targetingmul muslim. stop and frisk became a popular tactic for officers. we discussed it with faisel patel and john j college of criminal law. i askedfaiza why the new york city commissioner job is so important. >> important. >> it is the largest police department in the country. as new york goes, a lot of people are looking to see how it's conducting policing, what kind of tact i can it's using. >> maybe a man named bill braton who used to be the commissioner in new york, currently in los angeles. do you think it's a good move? >> i think that the new police commissioner has to do an important thing, rebuild relations with minority communities in the city. we have seen a drop decline. many credit bill braton from his first term when he used to be police commissioner for having put in place the systems t
. if they worked a shorter schedule but got productive things passed like a farm bill, like immigration reform, like an increase in minimum wage i think that wouldn't be an issue how many days they are in. it's the fact they don't seem to be working and producing anything. i have great respect for senator hutchison, did a great job in the senate and is just the type of person we need back in the senate but i don't think it's a tough call on minimum wage. we can't let a single mom with two kids continue to earn the minimum wage when it hasn't, as you said, been adjusted for inflation since 1991. the chamber always says it's going to cost jobs but that's never the case. i raised the minimum wage in pennsylvania and we had three of the best job growth years after that that we've had in decades in pennsylvania. when president clinton raised the minimum wage, same cry but it didn't happen. i agree with senator hutchison, do a separate carveout for students paid at a lower wage as opposed to adults trying to protect themselves and their families, that makes sense. that's reasonable. there ought to b
in the united states legally. >> he had ignored the immigration proceedings against him for decades. and after he was arrested on a drunk driving charge in 2011, some of the deportation proceedings started. he was under pressure to be deported, but this week, a judge said it was okay for him to stay in the united states. so, really, it's what he said in court, in the court proceedings this week about president obama staying with him for three weeks. that's kind of why the white house felt to need to come out and clarify this. >> the uncle is going to stay in the united states. obviously, he's lived here for 50 years, but he's finally got legal status. >> he does. legal status, he's going to get a green card. >> do we know if there's a relationship at all between the uncle and the president? do they talk on the phone, have meetings? >> there seems to not be any relationship. jay carney said they fell out of touch and they haven't really spoken. the attorney didn't indicate one way or the other. she didn't really want to go there. there seems to be no contact between the two. >> maybe they'll re
sooner than planned. he will come out of arrival toll at some point. he's got to go through immigration and get his bags. it could be a few minutes before we see him. just before he took off from beijing, we saw him in good condition. he was smiling. and he looked in good shape. this is what he had to say. >> i'm very glad to be on my way home. i appreciate the tolerance the dprk government has given to me to be on my way. >> i got to say for a 95-year-old guy he is doing incredibly well considering what he's been through. we understand that his son jeff is expected to be there to greet him at san francisco and then take him to his home in palo alto here in california. his wife also we ready to greet him. jeff saying earlier on it had been a very difficult time for his family and particularly him given his age p. he had a heart condition. while the release came about, one week after we saw him on the video confessing to hostile acts against the regime, the koreans rang up the obama administration without explanation saying, hey, we're releasing him and lo and behold he found himself in
fdr he has pushed the limits of executive authority on domestic matters to the limits. on immigration reform he's decided not to and all welfare laws, education, anti-drug laws, he has simply decided not to enforce divisions of the law and the biggest example is obama care where the employer mandate was delayed a year. if you like your insurance, you get to keep it well. turns out the law says, no, you can't. so he directed the state incidents to direct the insurance companies to go ahead and provide the same policies they had had before and also there's no subsidy provided for the federal exchanges as there is the state exchange and these are a lot of examples that more than any recent president has pushed his power to the limit, thus raising the question about whether he is upholding himself to faith fully execute the laws. >> the president has made an announcement, members of congress have said, okay, we'll codify that. we'll put it into legislation and then the white house immediately threatens to veto it. what kind of message does that send to those who are skeptical about that?
immigration reform. that is the course that is most effective. host: do you agree with the president? is the course that is most appropriate. >> do you agree with the president when he says that the only way to get it done is by step-by-step? the day, ind of think it is important for a bill to be brought to the floor of the house of representatives and frost to find something that can be passed at conference committee. for talking with us. the houses in early for session. virginia foxx to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. we pause in your presence and ask guidance for the men and women of the people's house. enable them, o god, to act on what they believe to be right and true and just, and to do so in ways that show respect for those with whom they disagree. send your spirit of peace upon our nation. endow the members of thi
issue from bleeding over to immigration or into the iran talks to other policy areas it is looking to move ahead on in the next couple of months and years? immigration, the encouraging the congress to take it, it juston, pass begins to sound like the same thing. when you have a weaker president, you are much less inclined to support what he is asking you to do. the white house position has oh is been the republicans have to see it as in their own best interest to make things right with a growing hispanic electorate, that they did very poorly the it -- poorly with in the last election. on iran, it is even more pressing. what the president is asking for to get a realths agreement with iran to reduce its capacity to enrich iranian. the credibility problem is not so much right now, although he is facing questions about it with congress in particular. in six months right now, what really concerns supporters of the president, what he -- would he be willing if iran has not agreed to dismantle the program, to end this process and reimpose sanctions to take a step toward more footing with i
of two immigrants who come from india. decades earlier. we lifed in a house in bedford, massachusetts a middle class family. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own having never held a job before. she faced going back to india, or going on welfare to support her two young children. in india, we would have been marked stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities would be limited. she made that tough choice. she stayed. we stayed. we were on welfare. we were on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to help pay for rent. but because of a series of events we were able to remain in bedford and i was able to go to the public schools. my mom eventually got at the job at the travel agent, and by the time i was 11, i'm proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. but i know i'm here also because a lot of people were -- expand opportunity. it's hard a little bit to share my story. but i know we live in cynic
priorities like immigration reform, gay rights and other issues like that. so for president obama to make that argument, i think immediately got the audience on his side. you heard giggles after he made that point. so i don't think it's surprising at all we heard him say that. >> how do you think, ed, it might impact next year's midterm elections? what list of accomplishments can republicans point to? >> well, they can point to the fact that they've tried dozens of times to either roll back or completely cancel the affordable care act. >> how many times is that, like 42? >> 41, 42 depending how you count it. there's that. >> by the way, tried. tried. >> yes. >> so accomplishments, what are they? >> accomplishments you mean laws that actually got through the house and senate? they are very few and very inconsequential for the most part. remember, this is an argument that can be made either way. speaker boehner was making a similar argument this week saying that it's senate democrats who blocked at least 150 different measures that were sent over, things that would have rolled back federal
: let me first say, james, i am a minority. my parents came from the philippines, immigrated here for better opportunity. in general, i am glad to see people, regardless of their race or creed or whatever, getting more involved in politics and just this debate. any differences i have with president obama and the administration has nothing to do with race or who he is or his personality. personal things. they have to do with issues of substance. substantive difference is a matter of policy. that is what a debate needs to be. i'm happy to engage with folks on issues of substance, but you know, certainly -- of course there will be people out there, i am not one of them, who do not like obama for really personal and probably wrongheaded reasons, but i try to be a constructive critic. i think the president has done some good things and he has done things that could have been done better, but that is the case with any president. host: what about mr. rouhani -- hassan rouhani? how is he different than the previous president? does that change negotiations with iran, and should we change t
to allow immigration to our country with people have capital. right now we're losing people. people going to canada because income tax is 15%. expedite these visas for people who have $50,000. detroit doesn't need a handout. look at the proud history of detroit. we were the industrial giant of the world, detroit was the greatness of america. government didn't do this. you did this. government didn't discover, create, motown greats like smokey robinson or diana ross. we need to look at ourselves. we need to look in the mirror and we need to allow ourselves the freedom to create and innovate. you have leaders. think of dan gilbert of quick and loans they are pouring their hearts and souls and money into detroit. quick and loans have spent more than a billion dollars in detroit and moved 3600 employees into the city, creating thousands of jobs. quick and loans and center companies have 12,000 employees working in detroit. quick and loans is proving all the nay sayers wrong. go to quick and loans and you'll get a glimpse of detroit's future. detroit situation is a result of a corrupt marriage
. not immigrated, am repatriated. there is a difference. understand, why after 20 we are still in deadlock. i completely agree with many of , that i had had very bad guys. we had very good dollars -- guys who believe this was possible. we had the prime minister in netanyahu, and even in the white plantation. but despite all of these efforts, and of course all of the efforts of the american side, we are in deadlock. without understanding why are we are in deadlock, it is pop -- impossible to move ahead. there is a mistake that i think that i see. even not from security, and not fromour refugees, but people who think that do not trust about confidence, and credibility. today the trust between the two sides is about zero. it is impossible to create peace if you do not have any credibility. the mistake from all our -- upences in the past until today we only signed the treaties with the government and the rulers, not with the states, not with the people. it was our agreement with the rulers. i think that we must achieve solutions --nds of comprehensive solutions. >> let me ask you about one part o
immigrants seeking to go to china as a haven from whatever problems they may face at home. i think the key to america's future is not what china does. it is what america does. ande develop our economy govern ourselves effectively, i think our soft power, economic power, and military power will be very adequate to our needs. china is making progress. we should hope china makes progress. after all, it is 20% of the world's people. we ought to wish them the best. on the other hand, we ought to be mindful of our own security and other interests. host: we have one viewer that puts it this way. the same people that fear competition fear china. guest: i do not know how you can be a capitalist and fear competition. we think that is a driving engine. if the chinese become more innovative, we've got to educate our kids and grandkids to innovate even faster. values out-of-the-box thinking, entrepreneurship, venture capital. i think we are constructed as a society to be very competitive in the 21st century. china has lots of problems that limit its capacity to be as competitive as we can be. the tradi
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)